Can a toothache be related to being sick?

I’ve had a toothache in two of my teeth on my lower jaw for the past couple days. I just went to the dentist a little over week ago and I didn’t have any cavities. I have been sick with a cold for the past week though and I heard that sometimes you can get a bacterial infection in your teeth from being sick?

Yes toothaches can be related to getting sick. Anything from colds to worse. Staph is the worst, once it gets under your gums and then under a tooth you will never get it out again without pulling the tooth and getting at that pocket. This is one reason it is important to clean hands often and never put stuff in your mouth (pencils, pens, whatever)
When an infection flares up in your mouth (under your teeth or in the gums) it can manifest in many different ways. It could appear as a cold. Headaches are common from things growing and then accessing your sinus areas. If you have bad infections in your teeth you will get sick on a regular basis or extended basis. You will build up an immunity over time, which only means you wont be sick all the time. Or being sick becomes the status quo, so you begin to not notice it. On occasion however the infections will grow enough to make you sick again. These illnesses are usually easily identifiable even though they manifest and appear to be a cold or flu like, the difference will be the speed of the onset. Sickness from infections in your teeth come quickly and without any noticeable buildup. You go on coffee break come back and wham you have something that feels just like the flu. Only without the slow onset of sore throat and muscle pain that would give signal you were getting sick.
One sign that an infection is building up is the toothache, more defined if accompanied by pain in the gum. (it will be sore to the touch, sometimes soft inflamed and red. It can have some or all of these symptoms) As the infection grows it builds immense pressure on the teeth and tissue, this pressure can be so great that it moves the teeth, putting pressure and pain on the tooth or teeth next to it. One sign that the infection requires serious attention is the tooth will "wiggle". What attention that is, I can not say. Especially if the infection is staff, the most successful antibiotics for staff are topographical (they dont penetrate deep layers of tissue. They dont penetrate muscle at all, and bone…) Even oral antibiotics that target staph function only in the outer layers. Then there is MRSA or whatever, thats Antibiotic Resistant Staph. If you got MRSA or whatever it is…ouch.
If you got a wiggly tooth, dont wiggle it, avoid eating on that side or eat soup. I suppose see a dentist. I know it’s expensive, which is really crazy. Stop consuming caffeine and avoid Aspertame(the stuff in diet sodas) if you need to use a sweetner, sugar is best, next best is that nasty sweet-N-Low, never the blue packet which is aspertame.

Back to the tooth and in closing (sorry for the length but this means something to me.) If you have infections under your teeth you need to do something about it, because if the infection gets in your bloodstream it will spread anywhere and everywhere in your body. If it roots in your brain, youll die quick. If it startsup in your heart, youll die slower. On the back side of your eyes? your doctor will diagnose you with diabetes as you slowly go blind. So it’s very serious.

I just lost one of my teeth from a long term infection
http://au.answers.yahoo.com/question/index;_ylt=Ak6X1c7d5eMBeuope1X3Prbg5gt.;_ylv=3?qid=20090818212752AA2aFde

Good luck
Keep looking up, Cuz that’s where it all is!

(\ _ /)
(=’.'=)
(”)_(”)

5 Responses to “Can a toothache be related to being sick?”

  1. No you wouldnt get a toothache from a cold, but you should check to make sure that you dont have a absess in your tooth, that could make you get a fever and fatigue. Just incase you should rinse your mouth out with salt water to keep it clean.
    References :

  2. crazyroxychick88 on April 29th, 2010 at 6:34 pm

    Usually if its upper teeth then yes due to the sinuses, but sometimes cold medications can also make your teeth sensitive.
    References :
    Registered Dental Assistant

  3. My mom always says her upper teeth hurt when she is getting sick (something to do with the location of your sinuses) I have also experienced this when I have been severely congested I took some tylenol based cold medication and it made me feel better through out the day and Nyquil at night time. Worked great! watch for a fever which can be a sign of something more serious.
    References :
    My personal experience

  4. Yes toothaches can be related to getting sick. Anything from colds to worse. Staph is the worst, once it gets under your gums and then under a tooth you will never get it out again without pulling the tooth and getting at that pocket. This is one reason it is important to clean hands often and never put stuff in your mouth (pencils, pens, whatever)
    When an infection flares up in your mouth (under your teeth or in the gums) it can manifest in many different ways. It could appear as a cold. Headaches are common from things growing and then accessing your sinus areas. If you have bad infections in your teeth you will get sick on a regular basis or extended basis. You will build up an immunity over time, which only means you wont be sick all the time. Or being sick becomes the status quo, so you begin to not notice it. On occasion however the infections will grow enough to make you sick again. These illnesses are usually easily identifiable even though they manifest and appear to be a cold or flu like, the difference will be the speed of the onset. Sickness from infections in your teeth come quickly and without any noticeable buildup. You go on coffee break come back and wham you have something that feels just like the flu. Only without the slow onset of sore throat and muscle pain that would give signal you were getting sick.
    One sign that an infection is building up is the toothache, more defined if accompanied by pain in the gum. (it will be sore to the touch, sometimes soft inflamed and red. It can have some or all of these symptoms) As the infection grows it builds immense pressure on the teeth and tissue, this pressure can be so great that it moves the teeth, putting pressure and pain on the tooth or teeth next to it. One sign that the infection requires serious attention is the tooth will "wiggle". What attention that is, I can not say. Especially if the infection is staff, the most successful antibiotics for staff are topographical (they dont penetrate deep layers of tissue. They dont penetrate muscle at all, and bone…) Even oral antibiotics that target staph function only in the outer layers. Then there is MRSA or whatever, thats Antibiotic Resistant Staph. If you got MRSA or whatever it is…ouch.
    If you got a wiggly tooth, dont wiggle it, avoid eating on that side or eat soup. I suppose see a dentist. I know it’s expensive, which is really crazy. Stop consuming caffeine and avoid Aspertame(the stuff in diet sodas) if you need to use a sweetner, sugar is best, next best is that nasty sweet-N-Low, never the blue packet which is aspertame.

    Back to the tooth and in closing (sorry for the length but this means something to me.) If you have infections under your teeth you need to do something about it, because if the infection gets in your bloodstream it will spread anywhere and everywhere in your body. If it roots in your brain, youll die quick. If it startsup in your heart, youll die slower. On the back side of your eyes? your doctor will diagnose you with diabetes as you slowly go blind. So it’s very serious.

    I just lost one of my teeth from a long term infection
    http://au.answers.yahoo.com/question/index;_ylt=Ak6X1c7d5eMBeuope1X3Prbg5gt.;_ylv=3?qid=20090818212752AA2aFde

    Good luck
    Keep looking up, Cuz that’s where it all is!

    (\ _ /)
    (=’.'=)
    (”)_(”)
    References :

  5. Yes, it can. Before I had a tooth pulled after several failed restoration attemtps, there was a massive infection under the tooth. It didn’t really hurt that much but I wondered why I wasn’t feeling all that good. I didn’t start feeling better until after I had the tooth pulled and started taking antibiotics for the infection.
    References :

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